The seventh concubine ~ Tallis Steelyard

Reblogged from Jim Webster, aka Tallis Steelyard:

Italian_Osteria_Scene,_Girl_welcoming_a_Person_entering,_by_Wilhelm_Marstrand_-_Ny_Carlsberg_Glyptotek_-_Copenhagen_-_DSC09271

Tiddal, Lord of Muchness Tower, was one of the old Partannese nobility. He was born, luckily for himself, in the more civilised part of Partann where it is not merely possible, but expected, for a son to follow his father into the Lordship of a territory. Not only that but whilst his lands were far enough north to avoid the taint of being part of Uttermost Partann, they were far enough south to avoid too much influence from Port Naain.

Hence it was that many of the old customs prevailed. This, I feel, is neither a good not a bad thing. Still my opinion was never sought in the matter so I shall not judge. Still one custom that survived in the area was that of Levirate marriage. This is where the brother of a deceased man is obliged to marry his brother’s widow. Note that this is no formality, one of the intentions is that the widow will produce children who will be the heirs of her deceased husband.

Continue reading at Tallis Steelyard

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She writes alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. Find out more at France and Vincent. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent. Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com.
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3 Responses to The seventh concubine ~ Tallis Steelyard

  1. jwebster2 says:

    Apparently one can have too many concubines, especially if you’re not allowed to chose them yourself
    Who would have known it?

    Like

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