Guest author: Marilyn Armstrong – Worms in the fridge

My house was neat enough if you didn’t look too closely. You could walk into it without falling over a pile of dirty clothing (that was all in the basement — another story entirely) and the dogs and cats were  (usually) housebroken. I couldn’t say the same for my toddler or my friends. Overall, the toddler was less of a threat to house and home than the friends, but when they got to messing around, anything could happen.

As my son grew, he developed (what a surprise) a passion for all kinds of creatures. Rabbits. Hamsters. Birds. We already had cats (many) and dogs.

We never properly owned more than two dogs but often had three or four. Two of them were ours. One was on loan from a friend who was in the army or on the road playing gigs. The fourth had belonged to a houseguest who had left but somehow forgotten to take their dog. Sometimes, it took us years to get the owner to come back and take the furkid too.

I love animals that aren’t insects, so while I frequently pointed out that it was NOT my dog and would they please come and get him or her, I would never throw them out. The owner I might toss out the door, but never the dog.

The year Owen turned eight, he decided he wanted geckos. They were the “in” things for 8-year-old boys that year. I pointed out that I didn’t think they would last long with the cats in the house.

He wanted the geckos. I was not much of a disciplinarian. If you argue with me, I’ll say no at least twice. After that? I usually give up.

As soon as we got the terrarium and the plants and finally settled the geckos into their home, Owen promptly lost interest in them and rediscovered his bicycle. That left me to care for the geckos, who would only eat mealworms.

I am not a big fan of worms. Any worms. I can tolerate earthworms because they are good for the soil, but overall, if it creeps or crawls, it’s not my thing. Did I mention that the geckos would only eat LIVE mealworms? I had to buy them in little cups at the pet store.

So mom dropped over and the cup of mealworms for the geckos had tipped over in the fridge. Which was now full of tiny worms. I assured her that my fridge does not usually contain worms and the worms were what the geckos ate. I don’t think she believed me. It was years before she would eat anything at my house.

As for the geckos, a few days later, the cats figured out how to open the terrarium and there were no more geckos. And thankfully, no more mealworms.


marilyn birthday 68About the Author

Marilyn Armstrong is a writer, blogger and photographer. She started writing as soon as she could form letters and has never heard a single good reason why she should stop. Marilyn and her husband Garry, as well their son, daughter-in-law, granddaugher and various intrepid canines, live in a setting of rare natural beauty and gigantic rocks in rural Massachusetts.

Marilyn blogs at Serendipity where she offers “memories via anecdotes, observations, occasional fiction, and photographs.”


Find and follow Marilyn

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The Twelve Foot Teepee

Fighting the of demons of an abusive childhood and having given up on traditional paths to personal salvation, Maggie decides to find her own path … by building a teepee in her back yard. It’s a peculiar route, but her goal is simple: offload the cargo of her past and move into a future, sans luggage. Armed with a draw knife and a sense of humor, she peels poles and paints canvas until winter passes and she is free.


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About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She writes alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. Find out more at France and Vincent. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent. Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com.
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10 Responses to Guest author: Marilyn Armstrong – Worms in the fridge

  1. Thank you! That worked out pretty well after all 🙂 Happy Monday to you. I hope it’s not as worm, er warm there as here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sue Vincent says:

      For England, it is vilely hot … in the eighties with no breeeze and no rain for weeks. There are fissures in my now-concrete ‘lawn’ big enough to swallow my legs, let alone Ani’s. We melt 🙂

      Like

  2. Thank you for this. I have to warn you that the link to my site isn’t working. This is the link and although it hasn’t changed, it’s possible it just got old and tired.

    https://teepee12.com/

    Because I haven’t published this piece yet (Thursday or Friday, I think), you can’t link to it, yet. So this is just a link to my site, without a specific post. So it will just go to the top of the page.

    Like

  3. Lyn Horner says:

    LOL Worms and insects are not my thing either. Neither are geckos, but I used to have a cat who loved catching them and dropping them by the front door, often beheaded or missing other body parts. My husband had the pleasure (Ha!) of picking them up and disposing of them. I refused to go near the poor dead critters!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Mary Smith says:

    Wonderful post – thanks for making me laugh. I don’t mind worms but geckos don’t seem a particularly interactive pet. Well done the cats.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. jenanita01 says:

    I remember days like that. I once found a dead (and smelly) fish in my son’s pocket…

    Like

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