Hello…

There was an almighty racket in the garden. It could only be a wren. The tiny songsters have a voice far too big for their size, and their song is incredibly rich and varied. This, though, was a persistent, juvenile cheep, at a volume that seemed impossible for a baby bird little bigger than a walnut. I needed only to turn my head, though, to see the culprit, perched on the fence and demanding to be fed.

Grabbing the camera, I snapped a few pictures, then put out some food…high enough so that Ani wouldn’t get it. She has taken to eating birdfood, given half a chance, and whether it is scraps…which okay, I could have given her… or the meal-worm fat balls, she doesn’t care. She’ll eat almost anything.

The youngster, his beak still wide and yellow with youth, pottered around for a bit having breakfast, then flew into next-door’s garden. I went back to the desk and to work. I could still hear him cheeping. That’s loud, for one so small, I thought. Then there was a fluttering and, that’s really loud… I turned my head, fingers still poised over the keys, expecting to see the bird at the open garden door, just as my juvenile robin had been last year. There was no sign, just the loud chirping…. and Ani looking at me very confused. I turned back to the PC… and the baby wren was sitting on the keyboard, cheeping away!

He looked at me, I looked at him…we both panicked. He must have been very surprised. I was only worried Ani would take matters into her own paws…and the intruder into her teeth. She may be good with baby birds, but she’s not seen one on my desk before… Nor, for that matter, have I. A quick flutter and I shooed him back outside, with Ani paying way too much attention for my peace of mind. He sat on the shed, probably getting his breath, while I bounced with quiet joy at the brief encounter.

 

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She has written a number of books, both alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com
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48 Responses to Hello…

  1. Henrietta Watson says:

    Reblogged this on Blog Pad 2017.

    Like

  2. Awww how lucky! I love it when little ones dance on the fence… but to have one hop on my keyboard?! Wow.

    Like

  3. The Satyr says:

    Wonderful! Curious little chap. What a lovely experience. x

    Like

  4. What a wonderful visitor! A true blessing

    Like

  5. noelleg44 says:

    What an amazing thing to happen! Maybe the bird popped in to thank you? But Ani eating bird seed? That girl is a true omnivore…

    Like

    • Sue Vincent says:

      Ani will eat anything someone else is supposed to be eating 😉 But oddly, although she’ll help herself from the frudge given chance, she won’t touch anything on plate or table…

      Like

  6. Mary Smith says:

    Lovely. Though Ani may have been less impressed than you.

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  7. He is a little cutie, what a treat for you Sue 🙂

    Like

  8. Jennie says:

    A terrific story. What an experience! How nice!

    Like

  9. jenanita01 says:

    Maybe he was a writer in a former life?

    Like

  10. Lyn Horner says:

    He’s a little adventurer! So brave, cute and persistent!

    Like

  11. We have Bewick’s wrens here; in fact, a pair nested in a shoe on my back porch a couple of years ago, despite humans, cat and dog coming and going. I like hearing their loud and varied sounds around the place. I’ve never had a bird come in the house though. That would be a somewhat tense experience.

    Like

  12. Widdershins says:

    A wren-y for your thoughts! 😀

    Like

  13. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Sue Vincent captures the moment a minute wren worms his way into her heart.. and escapes the clutches of her guardian of the hearth Ani..#recommended

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Lovely Sue.. I am proud to say that I am a sparrow mother.. looks like our seeders have encouraged two broods this year and the second batch of fledglings appear to be bonded to the back door opening and shutting. They sit in the hedge looking like scurrying mice and I feel hundreds of eyes watching me as I fill up the feeders..as soon as the door shuts they are there…

    Like

    • Sue Vincent says:

      I have a nest of sparrows under the eaves too…and in spite of Ani’s best efforts, they are always in the garden. I missed my colony in the honeysuckle hedge when I moved here, but the sparrows seem intent on joining me 🙂 xx

      Liked by 1 person

      • Much as I like cats I have had to discourage two that think that the baby sparrows are manna from heaven.. One was parking himself backwards behind a calor gas cannister he was so cheeky.. they now believe that a rather large and ferocious lion lives in the house and that the neighbours garden is a better bet! x

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        • Sue Vincent says:

          I’m more of a dog person…not that you’d have ever guessed 😉 …but I seem to be attracting a lot of cats lately at Nick’s place. Only one of them though is a huntress…and she lives there. x

          Liked by 1 person

  15. Reblogged this on JANE STURGEON and commented:
    ❤ Sue ❤

    Like

  16. Reblogged this, ❤ Sue. xX

    Like

  17. Adele Marie says:

    wow, that is amazing. What a beautiful, if worrisome encounter. xxx

    Like

  18. jstansfeld says:

    I read this lovely tale on Jane ‘s re-blog. I enjoyed it so much that I’m now a follower! Last year our Wrens nested in the greenhouse. The young grow so fast, one day they are minute fledglings, and within a couple of weeks all flown. On the day that they departed Mr. Wren spent the morning serenading me from the rail on our back deck. I translated his song into a song of joy that his young had gone, it might have been sadness but that’s not what I heard!

    Like

  19. paulandruss says:

    What a lovely story

    Like

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