Moonlight

I was awake far too early again this morning. Moonlight wandered in and dream-filled eyes looked out. The sky was still dark and the stars were hidden behind cloud and mist. I had been half awake for some time, thinking about stars… and that state on the edge of dream holds some strange concepts. The thoughts were not new… are any thoughts truly original? I wondered how many human beings have paused on the edge of slumber to consider the stars that wheel overhead every night, unregarded by most of us, most of the time.

I wondered about stars. We know there are planets… suns… galaxies… billions of the things twinkling away up there. To us they are just ‘stars’ most of the time. We assume we understand them to a certain degree, knowing what they are made of. Yet does that mean we really know what they are?

I thought about water. H2O… everybody knows that. We all know what water is and how it is made by two hydrogen atoms waltzing with an oxygen atom. We know what it looks like, feels like, where it comes from, what we use it for, what we need it for… but do we know what it actually ‘is’?

Every culture, every people, even any writer who has touched on these things, has created their own mythology of the stars to explain their nature. Long before telescopes and spacecraft we already ‘knew’ what the stars were. They were gods and heroes, mythical creatures… the souls of the dead. They were angelic beings or divine lights in the sky. They were, in my somnolent state, the souls of the departed, rainbow fragments of being awaiting rebirth…pinpricks in the map of heaven that let the Light shine through, showing us that there was something beyond the world we live in.

I suppose I wasn’t questioning the nature of the stars as much as the nature of reality and how the time and place of our birth on history’s pages colours our perception and understanding of that reality.

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About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She has written a number of books, both alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com
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4 Responses to Moonlight

  1. Widdershins says:

    The more I learn about the science of things, the more I am in awe and wonder at it all. We like to think we know a great deal about the world around us, and the ones beyond the stars, but we don’t. We only tell ourselves this, because to contemplate the true enormity of it all, is far too scary … and I don’t think we are capable of it at this stage of our evolution.
    I’m so glad I’m a SF writer. My mind lingers at the outside edges of those places, and head out over that precipice and wonder, what if … 😀

    Like

    • Sue Vincent says:

      I wonder too… and I think those who delve into SF and fantasy, as well as those who choose a conscious path through the spiritual realms, have the advantage there. Wonder is an integral part of the journey.
      I think, though, that many whose allegiance is given to science must feel it too, or the curiosity would not be there to see beyond the surface. The difference, for me at least, is that science requires a defining description…where I am happy to live in awe. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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