Temporarily immortal

december dawn 001 sue vincent (4)Morning lights the east with liquid flame as the earth and I shrink into ourselves, frozen and pensive. Even so, with such beauty as this you almost wish you could live forever so the memory of it would never fade. The dog, dismisses my philosphical mood and with her usual abandon, races across the field with every evidence of selective deafness. Ignoring both blandishment and command with her lopsided grin, she chases her breath in circles and greets the birds. Why, after all, would she want to come back to a nice, warm house and breakfast when there are moments like this to be had?

december dawn 001 sue vincent (14)The sky changes, moment by moment, fierce flame and pastel softness vying for attention. It is, of course, incredibly boring for her to sit inside when there is a whole world out there to explore. Ani would far rather chase the morning than curl up by the fire. I, on the other hand, would happily go for the curling up today. It is cold and fingers struggle with the camera. Hibernation feels like a good option this morning.

december dawn 001 sue vincent (16)Yet I can’t help thinking how much of life is spent in slumber already. Not just the necessary and healing luxury of sleep, where the realms of possibility unfurl over a landscape of dream; but the hours spent half awake, going through the motions of survival in our busy world, in submission to the systems that regulate our movement through the labyrinth of blind alleys and perceived opportunities that litter our days.

december dawn 001 sue vincent (17)Even our bodies adjust their rhythm to the clockwork dance of time; hours devoured by hands that grasp each second as they turn in never ending circles; seeking to define that illusive ‘now’ in which we are supposed to be and which is already the past before we are aware of its passing.

december dawn 001 sue vincent (18)The flaming dawn ignites the horizon in a momentary blaze of splendour never to be repeated. For me it is the immediacy of a ‘now’ that can never come again. Yet of course, the sunrise I see is illuminated by light born far away and in the darkness of our night. The luminous glow that unfolds came into being over eight minutes ago at the centre of the solar system, before I even left home. Its now is my past. My now is my past too, over before it has been perceived… its separation from the present marked by the milliseconds required for neural transmission.

december dawn 001 sue vincent (24)My cold-numbed mind is aware of a concept beyond words as I finally catch the laughing dog and head home in search of coffee. I am moving in what I see as a linear fashion through what I think of as time, yet it is such an elastic concept in our lives. I think about our perception of time and how it slows and speeds us through our days. How it flies in laughter or drags its heels through boredom and loneliness. The more new information the brain has to process, the slower time appears to pass for us… the more familiar the input we receive, the faster it seems to slip away. The long, hot summers of childhood were filled with wonder, the shortening years of age pass in swift familiarity. Minds constantly learning with childlike abandon stay more alert than those content with the known…december dawn 001 sue vincent (32)I dredge up the science I have read and conversations shared on those subjects and it seems that time itself, at least on a subjective level, is a perception; an elastic frame within which we order the chaos of experience.

december dawn 001 sue vincent (36)Lurking around the freeze-dried edges of a warped imagination is the vague idea that here lies the key to immortality… the fabled elixir of eternal youth. If our days were filled with wonder and new learning, if our minds and bodies were alert to every scrap of information and attentive to experience, how slowly would our lives appear to run? Could we ‘stop time’ through our perceptions so that even a short life would feel like a long one? And is that eyes-wide-open awareness the secret of those of our elders who seem graced with the glow of inner joy that takes little account of physical age or bodily health?

december dawn 001 sue vincent (38)

I wouldn’t want immortality … wouldn’t even want eternal youth in the normal sense, but I would rather like to grow old with the wondering eyes of a child; with relish, not regret for the life I have been privileged to be a part of; something not mine but entrusted to me to do with the best I could. That kind of temporary immortality of perception I think I could handle.december dawn 001 sue vincent (42)

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She has written a number of books, both alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com
This entry was posted in Dogs, Photography, Spirituality and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

49 Responses to Temporarily immortal

  1. Beautiful, thought provoking post – and truly stunning photos! I particularly resonated with your point about often being only half awake through the busyness of our days…surviving is not the same as living. A perfect post to start my day with… Blessings, Harula x

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So well put. Wonderful, Sue.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Prajakta says:

    These shots are absolutely gorgeous and they go so wonderfully with the mystery of your words. Moments like these make us realize, that perhaps we are not meant to understand it all but just enjoy.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Mary Smith says:

    Beautiful photos, Sue, particularly appreciated this morning as my part of the world is shrouded in fog. Hibernations sounds like a sensible idea.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. willowdot21 says:

    So much here to make me think! Time is man made for convenience, I do not know what we live in it is nature’s linear cycle. My sister does not believe in time, she is so infuriating!!! My mother in law at 97 is a bright eyed sharp minded woman beaten cancer twice in the last 10yrs both times given 6months to live. There is a large degree of selfishness, for want of a better word, about her. I admire her, I think she wants to live forever but I do not want to out live all my friends and family piers. I know there a younger generations but she does miss her friends and siblings. I would feel lost. Anyway Sue I am depressing myself …. Your photos are so beautiful and your words so thought provoking. xxxx

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Beautiful pictures and an interesting thought. I’ve talked with friends about the idea that we could live longer if we weren’t working and stressing our days away. The whole ‘I can’t wait until I get home’ mentality might make us psychologically speed things up. The mind and body are strongly connected when it comes to health, so it wouldn’t be surprising to learn that one can speed up the decay of the other. This is really making me consider how much time humans waste or lose because of the work/money-focused society we’ve made.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Wow, this is beautiful, Sue, beautiful countryside you live in. Wonderful words that ring so true for me, and I suspect, many others. xxellen

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Reblogged this on MOONSIDE and commented:
    A fellow blogger’s amazingly beautiful set of visual and verbal truths…

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Bernadette says:

    That morning sky is magnificent. I would also like to grow old young and die healthy.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Henrietta Watson says:

    Reblogged this on All About Writing and more.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. So many beautiful scenes here Sue.. and I agree with your words here when you said
    “I wouldn’t want immortality … wouldn’t even want eternal youth in the normal sense, but I would rather like to grow old with the wondering eyes of a child; with relish, not regret for the life I have been privileged to be a part of; something not mine but entrusted to me to do with the best I could.”

    I hope we all continued doing the best we can.. 🙂
    Have a great day

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Erik says:

    Poetry in prose. With lots I hope people will ponder rather than just enjoy in the moment of reading, including this: “I can’t help thinking how much of life is spent in slumber already. Not just the necessary and healing luxury of sleep, where the realms of possibility unfurl over a landscape of dream; but the hours spent half awake, going through the motions of survival in our busy world, in submission to the systems…”

    Liked by 1 person

  13. paulandruss says:

    Beautiful photographs and words that stir such deep emotion. As te chap above said Poetry in prose

    Like

  14. I adore thinking about time as an artificial construct, and all the implications if we could just step outside it. Thank you for this gorgeous reflection!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Widdershins says:

    I agree … although, I think I’d like a ‘Brigadoon’ button too. 😀

    Like

  16. What stunning pictures. I love the dazzling colours of the sky.
    I have to admit that I am probably going through life half awake at times, and missing out on all kinds of things.

    Like

  17. Such reasoned thinking inspired by the sublime beauty. Was all this musing done before or after coffee? 😉

    Like

  18. wherebearsgo says:

    There’s so much beauty in this post!💚

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Rae Longest says:

    Reblogged this on blogging807 and commented:
    Outstanding photos and beautiful words from an author who frequently provides both. Check out her blog.

    Liked by 1 person

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