Going West – Pentre Ifan

Wales 117

It is a magical place. You are in no doubt of that as you walk along the path to the site. Hoary stones nestle in the hedgerow. Bluebells, those delicate woodland flowers that bloom only in spring, are blooming on the hillside at midsummer, scattered through the grass as if giving warning that here, time holds no sway and to step into the enclosure is to step out of this world’s realm and into another.

Wales 159

Your first sight of Pentre Ifan takes your breath away. I saw it many years ago, on a day that invited no other visitors… we had the place to ourselves for hours and time to get a feel for this sacred space. And, although many things here may be debated and pondered upon by minds scientific or spiritually inclined, there is no doubt about its sanctity.

Wales 118

It is the gigantic head of a bird that greets you, its beak held aloft by stone as insubstantial as a feather, looking out over the valley. Here, it is not just the stones that ‘get’ you. It is the place itself. Little wonder, when there are so many tales of the Fair Folk being sighted here, especially as the moon rises on a summer night.

Wales 135

Some tales tell that they are red-capped and resemble small soldiers. Others, less forthcoming but more believable, speak of insubstantial beings, impossible to capture but who converse with those rare few who can see them.

Wales 146For more pictures and to continue reading about this extraordinary site, please visit The Silent Eye

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She writes alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. Find out more at France and Vincent. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent. Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com.
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15 Responses to Going West – Pentre Ifan

  1. ellenbest24 says:

    In some ways it reminds me of Avebury in Wiltshire where I once lived, when the stones were giant shaddows that shaded the sun and made me shivver. I go back and they have shrunk in size, but the shivver is not because of shade. I live one hour from Stonehenge today and the regimental fencing off that has taken place the marching of visitore around the outside has taken away something … its freedom of spirit. Thank you for posting. Wales has many quirky oddities as does Ireland, there is so much more to our country than meets the eye.

    Like

    • Sue Vincent says:

      I envy you living at Avebury, Ellen. I go there frequently and love the place. Love exploring the stones and the landscape too. I agree withyou about Stonehenge though. I went there many times as a girl, before the fences and the visitor centres… to be among the stones then, with few others around, just an open horizon… that’s something I won’t forget.It felt completely different to how it feels today. Now it is a wild thing caged.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. It is so beautiful and I want to ask you to take me there. Haha.

    Like

  3. Widdershins says:

    By the time I got to the end of that post I was in tears … again! … not sad or happy tears, but ones of connection. πŸ™‚

    … and the link worked fine this time. πŸ™‚

    Like

  4. Certainly IS breathtaking, love it.

    Like

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