The edge of the precipice

X ilkley weekend 050Driving home this morning from work there was one of those moments of sheer, unadulterated joy when the fields were lit with pale sunshine, the winter sky blue and the feel of the car around me occupied my whole being. I can’t think of a better way of putting it. It is one of those things for which words seem too small. Yet, you could argue, it is only a car… getting on a bit, less than perfect and just a machine.

On the other hand what it means to me, personally, is something quite different. The world inside the car is a place out of the ordinary. It is a haven from importunate necessity, an oasis of silence in spite of the roar and rattle it carries with it; a place where thoughts can blossom and bear fruit. It is possibility, control and freedom… and sometimes escape. It allows me to serve the needs of everyday life, as well as to follow my heart into the hills.

In itself, of course, it is none of these things. It is just a metal box on wheels. It becomes, however, the symbol for all these things and more because it is the vehicle of my choices.

It took me a long time to pluck up the courage to learn to drive. I had started… had my first lesson… in my late teens just before a drunk driver ploughed into the car in which I was a passenger. A fractured skull and a rearranged, reconstructed face left me too afraid of cars to try and drive again. The blow to the fragile self-confidence of a teenager was profound and the scarred face itself a major life-lesson it took many years to appreciate for the gift it was.

X ilkley weekend 033

Over the years many people encouraged me to try and learn to drive. It was nearly twenty years before I found the courage to try again and only then because I felt it necessary when my partner was terminally ill. I wouldn’t have done it otherwise. I was too scared and had absolutely no confidence in my ability to become either safe or proficient. Fear had me completely caged, but I came to a point where I felt ready to tackle the bars of my self-imposed prison.

Perhaps those who had encouraged or pushed me to learn earlier were right. Or perhaps I would not have had the confidence to learn before I did. I may have missed years of enjoyment… or avoided a potentially lethal fear hitting the road. Who knows? Be that as it may, I made a decision and went for it.

All I do know for certain is that by the end of that first month’s lessons I was hooked. I loved it. These days, even some fifteen years later, there are few places I am happier than behind the wheel. I love driving. Facing the fear had proved it to be no more than a shadow and, critically, one I realised that I had adopted and accepted as a habit. The car, previously a symbol of distress and panic, became a thing of confident joy.

It is often the way. There are choices we have to make, fears, perhaps, that we have the opportunity to face; personal precipices where we stand on the edge looking out over what seems to be a huge gulf of terrifying uncertainty knowing you can only fall or fly.

There is a moment of calm and clarity when you know that you can choose your course of action. There may be those who urge you forward or who seek to pull you back, holding you in safety away from the edge. Yet while their advice and counsel may inform your decision, you are the only person who can make that choice. You are the only one who has the power to choose what course of action is really right for you at that time. Sometimes I feel it is only necessary to be genuinely prepared to face the moment and make a conscious choice.

You may choose to turn away from the edge… to step back into the safety of the known. You may choose to step off the edge of the precipice, knowing that you may fall.

And sometimes you find that you have wings.

X ilkley weekend 053

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She has written a number of books, both alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com
This entry was posted in Life and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to The edge of the precipice

  1. Wow Sue, what a journey your life has been….enjoy those wings 🙂

    Like

  2. I love your story and the photos of the bird taking flight. My Dad lost an eye at age 9 when a drunk driver ploughed into the car his step-dad was driving. I admired his courage to overcome that loss and his adventures along the way. Your courage also inspires me. What we miss when we are held back by fear. Life’s experiences may shape us, but it need not define or limit us. 😉

    Like

    • Sue Vincent says:

      I think they do define us in a way… but only as far as they do so by the choices we make in response to the circumstances and events we meet on the journey. But as for limiting ourselves though the opportuniy of experience… no 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Noelle Granger says:

    I had a second bout of nervousness about driving when each of my kids drove themselves off to school for the first time, so I had to let them get out on that ledge and take off! Lovely exposition!

    Like

  4. Éilis Niamh says:

    Beautifully said. 🙂

    Like

  5. TamrahJo says:

    Good for you! and can’t help but share the post I wrote years ago, that I thought of when reading yours, thinking, “Yup, I knew we had things in common” – LOL – though mine doesn’t have such lovely pictures gracing it – 🙂 as always, a pleasure reading! https://ballybin.wordpress.com/2011/04/27/cliff-jumping/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.