Harvesting changes

harvest being 2014 027Saturday morning we were up on the moor to greet the dawn. It was apparent that we were going to be doing so symbolically this time. There would be no golden orb rising in the east that we could see through the heavy cloud that enveloped the hilltops. Nonetheless, the moors take on a timeless mystery in such weather that only enhances the beauty of their spirit, even though the visual glory is veiled.

harvest being 2014 054We are given the weather we need; this weekend, after all, was all about the parallels we can draw from the world around us and the enshrouding mist is a rich source of such understanding. How often are the true gifts of life hidden within seemingly unpleasant situations? How often is beauty clouded by a lack of perception? We could have simply decided not to climb the sodden, chilly hillside before breakfast and remained instead in our nice, cosy hotel, knowing there would be no visible dawn, yet had we done so we would have lost the opportunity of knowing an unusual, ethereal beauty, not seen the shifting shapes of rock and tree, nor the heightened colour of autumnal foliage varnished with dew.

harvest being 2014 016We could not have felt the silent morning unfold, or seen the barely perceptible shift as the hidden sun rose above the fog, turning the world opalescent, luminous and ageless. The surface world was a place, it seemed, from which to retreat under the covers, snuggled in the familiar warmth of a bed or watched through the protective panes of a window. The drenching mist was not inviting, held few enticements… and yet, the reward for stepping into the unknown of the shrouded moor was beauty.

harvest being 2014 044Dew-heavy spiderwebs stretch out across the heather like the tents of a fairy encampment or sheets hung out to dry, sparking imagination and whimsy as we pass. The heather itself seems a microcosmic forest with its woody stems and flower heavy canopies. The rocks deepen from a uniform grey to blues and reds, the minerals highlighted by the moisture. Shapes are revealed that you would miss at any other time as the familiar becomes unfamiliar and you see it in a new light, silhouetted against a new, stark background.

harvest being 2014 051The last time my companion and I had spent time on the moors we had been drawn to a cluster of apparently random rocks, ‘erratics’, we assumed, left there by the shifting glaciers of the Ice Age. There was undoubtedly something special about the place and a little bird told us so, flying up and down for our delight before coming to rest mere feet away and watching us as we sat amongst the stones. We had revisited the spot before the arrival of our companions the previous day, speculating on their use and nature, whether the great stones had been deliberately placed or simply used and we had seen in the ashes of loss that these same rocks spoke also to others in a similar voice.

harvest being 2014 009You just never know what lies hidden beyond the edge of sight. Nor can we always see how we blind ourselves to the obvious by the focal length of our perception or the background against which we choose to see our world. Certainly on Saturday we would have chosen clear skies, light and colour over the all-pervading grey. Yet, as we returned to the hotel for breakfast my friend pointed out the rocks and shared our ideas with our companions. I turned and looking back, finally saw what it was that drew us. I did not have to explain… the startled expletive as I raised the camera was all that was needed for him to see in the mist what we had missed in the sunlight. Changing the familiar perspective had shown us greater clarity in the ghostly monochrome than any golden morning could have offered and out perception of that corner of the moors now lives in a different way. The ‘misty, moisty morning’ had revealed what the clear light of day had hidden, and the guardian, a silent sleeper, once seen now stands out among the rocks for us in a way we will not forget.

harvest being 2014 060

About Sue Vincent

Sue Vincent is a Yorkshire-born writer and one of the Directors of The Silent Eye, a modern Mystery School. She writes alone and with Stuart France, exploring ancient myths, the mysterious landscape of Albion and the inner journey of the soul. Find out more at France and Vincent. She is owned by a small dog who also blogs. Follow her at scvincent.com and on Twitter @SCVincent. Find her books on Goodreads and follow her on Amazon worldwide to find out about new releases and offers. Email: findme@scvincent.com.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Photography, Spirituality, The Silent Eye and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Harvesting changes

  1. Even more beauty! Thank you…..

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  2. ksbeth says:

    the color, the shades, wow –

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  3. alienorajt says:

    Lovely, just lovely, Sue xxx

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  4. I’ve almost got my foot on a plane….

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  5. Inspiring landscape. 🙂

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  6. Love those spider webs on the heather– the natural world belongs to the spiders.

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  7. I love to find the rock faces of the earth powers gazing skywards….what beautiful dreamy photos Sue

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